Sometimes You Just Need a Hoagie Roll Recipe

I have been baking bread for years, and the whole variability of this process is what tweaks my interest.

If you make a dough batch and split it, rise one half at room temperature it won’t taste the same as the other half that was risen in the refrigerator over night.  The longer rise will give you a more complex flavor which is great if that is what you want.

Brush the roll with egg wash and it will be shiny.  Leave it unbrushed and you get what I have here.

And if you’re making them at home and want the same results every time, you may want to just let that go to the professionals.  Part of the art of baking is the understanding that next time most likely will be different.

For example, in Philadelphia there is a company that makes The Definitive Hoagie Roll.  Amoroso’s Baking Company has made them for decades, and we all say it’s what makes the cheesesteak.  However it has a limited distribution.  And while you can get that same taste of an Authentic Philadelphia Italian Hoagie at Wawa, trust me,  it gets difficult to find those same rolls “in the wild”.

Now that I am in South Florida, I’m truly in The Wild.

I am not saying that this recipe is identical, I will say that it does have approximately the same texture and taste, but on a quick rise in the oven, the flavor is good but can be “muted”.

So if you want an Amoroso’s Roll your best bet is to go find them.

However these are a good start.    It is a really good base recipe to explore your own talents.

The next time I make this recipe, I will do a long, overnight rise in my 37F/2C refrigerator and see where I am at.  That would strengthen the flavor which is what you want in a Pizza Dough.

After all being a baker means a constant feedback and refinement of your process and your recipies.

And some people just want a commercial white bread that tastes just like it did when it came out of the white plastic bag with primary colored blobs on it in the 1950s and ever since.

Ick.

This recipe may not be a sainted clone from the old sod, but it is a damn good recipe and I will be using it for a while.   It is a Challenge.

Some notes:

This recipe as written has a vigorous rise if risen at room temperature.   It requires you to look after it, and if you blink it goes from “doubled in size” to this weird giant blob that deflates when the cookie sheet gets tapped.  After one hour rising at room temp, I watched over this batch and checked in on it every 15 minutes.  On a rainy day it took 1 hour 40 minutes to rise to what you see on the results.

This recipe was made as dough in the bread machine, through first rise.  It had a slow first rise.  Be patient, they will rise.

When making this recipe, add the oil to the bucket of the bread machine once the dough has come together to allow more gluten to form.  It improves the texture and unless you are one of the punishingly small number of people with celiac disease, it will be worth the effort.

Finally, place a metal oven safe bowl in the bottom of the oven when cooking these rolls.  It provides humidity that will make the crust a bit more soft.

If that is your thing, here’s the recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 2 tsp Yeast
  • 4 tsp sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 1/3 cups water at 80-105F 30-40C
  • 3 cups All Purpose Flour or Bread Flour
  • 2 Tablespoons Olive Oil – to be added separately from above

Process:

  1. To your bucket of the bread machine or the mixer add Yeast, Sugar, Salt. and Water.
  2. Mix your wet ingredients and then allow it to rest until it has begun to foam, about 10-15 minutes.
  3. Add the flour to the bucket of the bread machine and start on Dough Cycle.
  4. When the dough has taken up the majority of the flour, add the two tablespoons of olive oil.
  5. Allow the dough to come together and knead.
  6. The bread machine will run through its cycle and do first rise for you.
  7. If not using a bread machine, allow your dough to double in size for first rise.
  8. Form your rolls on a lined cookie sheet.  Mine were 90 Grams each.
  9. Place the dough in a room temperature oven with the light on to rise.
  10. Check the dough every 20 minutes, however my experience is that the dough doubles in 1 hour and 40 minutes in an oven with the light on on a room temperature rise.
  11. When Ready, remove the dough from the oven, and Preheat oven to 400F.
  12. Bake Rolls for 10 minutes and check for Golden Brown color.
  13. Mine were finished in 14 minutes.

Variation:

  • Use an egg wash or olive oil wash to the outside of the rolls for a more polished appearance.
  • Dust some rolls with Sesame Seeds, Parmesan, or spices.
  • For a cold rise, the rise time will be longer when they are formed and out of the refrigerator but the taste will be more complex.  Put the dough into the refrigerator overnight, and then bring it out to shape and rise in the morning.
  • Don’t forget to watch over your bread.  Every 20 minutes of rise time or so.

Dinner Rolls, Burger Buns, Or Hot Dog Buns, This Is Your Recipe

Yes, I’m back on the whole bread baking thing.  I needed Hot Dog rolls for some Sweet Italian Sausage I had grilled the night before, so I decided to make my own.  They look a bit dark here, but they were pretty much perfect when I had them for lunch.

Relax, the recipe is a bit time consuming since you want to give this time to rise.  All the liquids together needed time to allow the yeast to activate before joining it with the flour, so you may mix them when you begin to see the bubbles.  They call this a Poolish, but you can call it whatever you wish.

The recipe below was 993 Grams, about 2 1/4 pounds.  The pictures made 11 rolls, 90g each.  Hey, I needed Hot Dog Rolls, and three round rolls per request.

Once separated, I allowed them to rise in an oven with the light on for an extra Two Hours before baking.

I made the recipe on the dough cycle in the bread machine and it turned out amazingly well.

The Process was simple:

  1. Mix Milk, Sugar, Beaten Egg, Butter, and Salt in a Microwave safe bowl.
  2. Warm the liquids until they are at the right temperature for yeast to process, 80-105F, 30-40C in the MIcrowave.
  3. Add the Yeast and stir until all of those ingredients are blended.
  4. Allow the Liquids to sit long enough for your yeast to begin to work 5-15 minutes.
  5. Add the Bread Flour to the bucket of a bread machine or your stand mixer.
  6. Add the Liquids to the Flour and mix well.
  7. Select Dough Cycle on the bread machine to get a silky smooth dough.
  8. When Dough is finished being mixed, place in bowl and allow to rise until double in size.
  9. Divide and Shape Dough into 10 parts in order to make Burger or Hot Dog Buns or smaller for dinner rolls, as needed.
  10. Place on Baking Sheet with Foil or Parchment and brush with egg wash or butter.
  11. Bake at 450F or 230C for 8 minutes and check every two minutes for golden brown.

The Ingredients are:

  • 3 3/4 Cups Bread Flour
  • 1 1/4 Cups (280mL) Milk (I actually used Powdered or Non Fat Dry)
  • 1/4 Cup (56g) White Sugar
  • 1 Beaten Egg
  • 2 Tablespoons (28g) Butter
  • 1 1/4 Teaspoons (16g) Active Dry Yeast
  • 3/4 Teaspoon (14g) Salt

Pumpkin Yogurt Bread Recipe

I had been chasing this can around the kitchen for far too long.

Having pulled it down from the counter, it was now or never.  I was going to do something with it.

I’m not really a fan of Pumpkin Pie.  Oh sure, I’ll eat it and enjoy it if it is offered.  I will just never go out to buy the stuff if I have a different choice.

Key Lime Pie anyone?  How about Cherry Pie?

So the canned Pumpkin sat.   I was going to make some dog biscuits with it.  I was going to make a pie to take with us to a party. 

I had plans for it.  But mostly the can just got shuffled around.

I had enough of that. 

All of that nonsense was running through my mind when I was looking to be creative over the weekend.   I had a list of recipes that I wanted to make.  Since the new bread machine came with them I thought I would try it out. 

This one popped out at me.  I could get rid of the Pumpkin and make something I liked at one step.

It turned out well, but the bread machine didn’t exactly like the recipe.  The fix was simple.  When you add all the ingredients, add the brown sugar first.

I was taught that when you cook with brown sugar, always pack it into the measuring cup to get an accurate measurement.  When I added the brown sugar last, the puck of the brown sugar sat on top like a surfer never getting mixed into the bread machine.  Break the puck up into pieces then add the rest of the ingredients to the bread machine bucket.

If you make this recipe in a stand mixer, you won’t have this problem.

At any rate…

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 Cup Water
  • 1/4 Cup Packed Brown Sugar
  • 1 Cup Canned Pumpkin  (I used the entire can of 12 ounces and it was fine)
  • 1/3 Cup Plain Yogurt
  • 1 Tablespoon Butter, Softened
  • 3 1/4 Cups All Purpose Flour, however you can substitute up to 1 1/4 cup Whole Wheat flour for a different flavor.
  • 1 1/2 Tesapoon Salt
  • 1 Teaspoon Pumpkin Pie Spice – Recipe for spice is here!
  • 1 3/4 Teaspoons Yeast

Process for Bread Machine

  • Add ingredients in order listed.
  • Break up Brown Sugar before adding the rest of the ingredients.
  • Cook in bread machine on your Sweet Bread Cycle

Process for conventional oven

  • Mix all ingredients in your stand mixer with dough hook until smooth.
  • Pour batter into greased 9 inch bread pans
  • Bake at 325 F for at least 50 minutes, or until done.
  • “Done” happens when it passes the Toothpick test, so look at it around 50 and see where you’re at.

Mango Jam Recipe, Fresh from the Bread Machine

I will admit it, Mangoes are something of an obsession with me.

My neighbor has a huge Mango tree that has just the right kind of fruit, Hagen Mangoes.  They’re beyond sweet, tasty and grow as large as 2 pounds each.

Unfortunately he “trimmed” the tree, which is to say he “elevated” the tree.  This means that the lowest fruit is more than my own reach of 8 feet from the ground.  Since it is a mature tree, the top leaves of it are at least 30 feet from the ground.

This means that in order to get the fruit, I have to use a Fruit Picking Pole, another pole duct taped to it, and maybe even a ladder.  It also means that there will be fruit left on the highest branches to mature to an almost melon size and weight.  What grows up, must fall down, and a 2 pound fruit will do some major damage when it crashes to the ground.

If you have a fruit tree, trim it like an umbrella, broad and not tall.  It will make it easier for you to pick later.

At any rate, what is now falling is the last fruit of the year.  So I wanted to do it justice by making something out of it.  I went in search for a good fruit Jam recipe and found an excellent one.  This will work with anything with a “pudding” consistency so I suspect if you wanted to make a banana jelly it would work too.  Of course if you want to save calories, you can reduce sugar by substituting in some Stevia or other alternate non-liquid granulated sweetener.  I did in the first batch, and went all sugar in the second batch, and both were wonderful.  You just couldn’t tell the difference.

The nice thing about it was that I was able to use this on my bread machine’s Jam and Jelly setting.  No effort at all.

Ingredients:

  • 4 Cups chunked ripe Mango pieces.
  • 1 Cup Sugar or other granulated sweetener such as Stevia as recommended on the package for substitution.
  • 1 Tablespoon of Lemon Juice.
  • 1 Package of unsweetened or sugar free Fruit Pectin.

Process:

  • Cut up your Mangoes into chunks until you have four cups of the fruit.
  • Mash slightly the Mangoes, and add to the bread machine’s bucket with impeller blade in place.
  • Add 1 Cup of Sugar or sweeteners.
  • Add 1 Tablespoon of Lemon Juice.
  • Add 1 Packet of Unsweetened SureJell Fruit Pectin.
  • Select Jam and Jelly program on your bread machine and press start.
  • Alternately, this may be cooked on medium on the stove until the jam begins to set.

I did use this recipe to can some Mango Jam for later by boiling the jars and lids to sterilize, then boiling the jars to re-sterilize and set the lids.  With all Canning Recipes, you are on your own to decide how long to store the result.

In the specific case of the second go with this recipe, I did my first ever canning without any help, so it really is a “Science Experiment” for me!

The Jam was a success and tasted wonderful on French Toast or with Peanut Butter on some homemade gingery bread.

You do bake your own bread don’t you?  If so, Pat’s Pizza Dough is a great basic recipe, or just search this blog for things like Cinnamon Muffins or Cinnamon Raisin Bread.  I can guarantee that all of those will work out well for French Toast since I have used them all for that once they got a little past their peak.